iClooly Multi-Touch Pen for iPad Review

The best thing about the iPhone and iPad is that they are finger friendly. No stylus needed. Sometimes a stylus does come in handy though and regular ones will not work with these devices due to their capacitive displays. I’ve reviewed other capacitive styli in the past, but today I want to tell you about the one that I think maybe the best – at least for the task I have for it. It’s the iClooly Multi-Touch Pen from Pyramid Distribution.

This iPad / iPhone stylus is the nicest one I’ve had the opportunity to review. It looks like a real pen, pocket clip and all.

The entire body is made of metal. The barrel is Black with Silver accents (there’s another version available in Pink) and the ends are both Silver. The length of the pen is 4.5 inches.

The outermost cap unscrews to reveal a regular stylus (non-capacitive). This won’t be of use to you with the iPad, but will work with devices that have a resistive touchscreen.

To access the iPad compatible stylus, you have to pull off the entire cap. Unfortunately, there’s no where to store this cap when when you’re using the stylus.

Pressing the opposite end will extend the ‘stylus’ tip.

You’re probably thinking the same thing I was at this point – what the heck kind of stylus is that? It looks like a brush instead of a stylus.

For comparison, here is the iClooly next to the Pogo Stylus and Radtech Styloid styli. The iClooly seems to work a lot better than the other two for me. I don’t use it for ordinary tasks of tapping icons to launch apps or scroll through lists though. My main purpose for the iClooly has been for drawing apps. And it works perfect for that.

It feels very similar to using a brush to paint. I’ve been having a lot of fun doodling with it using an app called Layers. And at $10, the price is right.

 

Product Information

Price:$9.99
Retailer:Pyramid Distribution
Pros:
  • Great for art programs
  • Capacitive and Resistive stylus tips in one pen
Cons:
  • Can't store cap on opposite end of pen
Posted in: iPhone, iPad, iPod, Reviews, Styluses

{ 13 comments… add one }

  • Rowan May 11, 2010, 11:46 am

    No place to put the cap when you’re using it is a BIG design flaw!

  • Eric May 11, 2010, 12:16 pm

    Just use a Slim Jim (seriously)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbneMYYI78Q

  • Julie May 11, 2010, 12:28 pm

    @Eric That is really disturbing ;)

  • Tip May 11, 2010, 1:51 pm

    Actually — depending upon how long the thing is — and it looks long enough — you can just slide the cap upside down on the pocket clip and it’ll store it nicely at hand.
    I agree with you all though — not having the cap fit the other end when in use is a major design flaw.

  • Jackie Cheng May 11, 2010, 10:45 pm

    I use the Dagi Stylus with my iPad. So precise for drawing. Will post a review of it shortly.

  • Julie May 12, 2010, 7:17 am

    @Jackie Please do. I’ve not seen that one.

  • rysiu May 31, 2010, 7:07 pm

    is it better than pogo sketch/stylus pens?

  • John June 23, 2010, 5:46 am

    The one thing all these styli reviews lack is whether or not you can use these with gloves on. I can speak for the Pogo, and it does work with gloves on, which comes in handy in colder climates, although sensitivity seems to drop just a bit. Personally, I use the Iphone/Ipad outside with the various star map programs and for that, the Pogo works just fine with gloves on.

  • Louise August 31, 2010, 4:24 pm

    How long will delivery be to Auckland, New Zealand and how much NZD will it cost me?

    Regards
    Louise

  • Glenn February 26, 2011, 8:37 am

    This is a revelation. When I first saw it, I was concerned that it was just another pogo style smudge pen. Boy was I wrong. Team it up with Penultimate on iPad and it is almost as easy to write text as using a resistive screen. Indeed, it works pretty well on a capacitors screen laptop with the handwriting app in Windows7, provided that you take your time and try not to scrawl your writing. The iclooly will do me until the computer industry actually gets the message that touch screens can be used for more than just finger painting and pushing icons around.

  • giancarlo November 25, 2011, 1:29 pm

    ok your stylus looks great but..why this icooly says in the box ah works in iphone,ipod & ipad.
    because i did order it online but when i use the poited one it did not work only the brush..
    before i order this item i did not also review this item because im saticefied to your item description…
    so im so disapoited now..

  • Julie November 25, 2011, 3:24 pm

    @giancarlo The iClooly is not MY product. The Gadgeteer is a review / news site. You’ll need to contact iClooly directly if you have complaints about their packaging. If you read my review, I state that the pointed tip does not work on capacitive screens.

  • GJ November 26, 2011, 8:39 pm

    While the pointed tip of the IClooly does not work on capacitive screens such as the iPad, it does work on resistive screens. This makes the iClooly quite a flexible device. I have also seen it in a version with a ball point pen fitted at the opposite end to the brush.

    I agree with Jackie Cheng’s post that the Dagi is a great stylus. Indeed, in my opinion it is the best stylus for capacitive screens if you want to take accurate notes as it provides a level of control approaching that of a pen stylus combined with a digitiser, such as a Wacom or N-Trig set up that you find on expensive HP and Dell tablet computers. I do like the iClooly, however, as it does everything that is claims on the box. It works with gloves, gives close to pen-like control and is clearly superior to the Pogo and other rubber or felt tipped styli.

    Giancarlo, if you are looking for pen-like accuracy, then my advice to you is that you ought to think about buying a tablet with a digitiser fitted. The HTC Flyer is such a tablet, although it only has a 7inch screen. It is probably also not lost on you that when reviews are written in English, things can sometimes get lost in the translation. I had a similar experience when using Google translation to purchase a guitar from a Japanese online store. Luckily it all worked out for me because the store had a number of English-speaking staff who could converse with me by email.

Leave a Comment