Tuner

korg-headtune

The Korg Headtune tuner takes all the mystery out of tuning guitar, ukulele and basses, so new players can concentrate on learning to play music instead of figuring out how to keep their instrument in tune. Shaped like the headstock of a guitar, bass or ukulele, the tuner clips on and has an easy to understand [...]

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Posted in: Music Gear, News
pitchclip

The Pitchclip from Korg is a chromatic clip-on tuner that will help you quickly and accurately tune your guitar, bass or ukulele. It features a display that can be reversed for easy viewing when mounted on either side of the instrument's headstock. The Pitchclip is available in 8 different colors and is priced at an affordable [...]

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Posted in: Music Gear, News
planetwaves-tuner

I'm a fan of guitar (and ukulele) tuners that use vibration help you to zero in on the right note for each string. Here's a new one from Planet Waves that looks like it might be pretty nice. It has a narrow LCD display that shows the currently tuned note for the string that you're [...]

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Posted in: Music Gear
tascam-pt7

Available in October, the Tascam PT-7 shoves three devices into one small package. The PT-7 starts with a high-speed chromatic tuner, adjustable to 7 alternate scales, adds a metronome that plays from the speaker or headphone at rates form 30 to 300bpm in six time signatures. And throws in a mono recorder that employs the [...]

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Posted in: Music Gear
korg-dt4-1

It's been a year since I rediscovered music by picking up the ukulele. Now I'm completely obsessed with this little instrument and in addition, all the accessories that go along with them. Ok, there really aren't THAT many ukulele accessories... But, one accessory that I use every time I play is a tuner. As a [...]

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Posted in: Music Gear
korg-dt-4

The DT-4 is a strobe style musical instrument tuner from Korg. It might be a good alternative to the more expensive Peterson strobe tuners. I've ordered one to review and use with my ukuleles.

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Since I recently started playing a ukulele, I've been interested in various accessories that go along with playing a stringed instrument. Admittedly, there aren't many. But the main accessory that I use every time I sit down to play (or try to play) a song, is a tuner. A month ago, I took a look a the Intelli IMT-500 tuner. I like it very much, but like any good gadgeteer, I'll be happy to dump it for something better. Today I'm going to tell you about the eNote Clip On Digital Chromatic Tuner from ELECA. Read on to see if it beats the Intelli.

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Posted in: Music Gear

Back in the stone age when I was learning to play guitar, there were only two ways to tune an instrument. By pitch pipe, or by ear. I wasn't good at either method and was always frustrated that my guitar sounded 'funky' when I would play it. Years later, when the first electronic tuners were introduced, I was over joyed. Finally an easy way to keep my instrument in tune. They only problems with those tuners were the fact that they were somewhat bulky and required either a quiet room or a patch cable to connect to the instrument's pickup. Things have changed since those days. Now we have nifty strobe type tuners like the Waves Strobe-On-String tuner that I reviewed not long ago and the Intelli IMT-500 Digital Chromatic Tuner that I'm going to show you today.

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Posted in: Music Gear

If you play guitar, either acoustic or electric, you probably own some type of tuner. Tuners come in several varieties. There are pitch pipe type tuners that make a sound for each guitar string. Your task is to then tighten or loosen the string until the sound it makes matches the reference note that the pitch pipe makes. Unless you have a really good ear, this is a very hard way to tune your instrument. Electronic tuners are much easier to use. These tuners have a microphone that picks up the sound a string makes when you pluck it. Then using a meter or some other method, it tells you if you need to loosen or tighten the string to bring it to the right pitch. The only problem with this type of tuner is that it requires a relatively quiet environment to work or if the guitar has a pick-up, you can connect the tuner using a cable. Today I'm going to tell you about a tuner that can work in the noisiest places, doesn't need a cable and is tiny enough to fit in your pocket. It's the Strobe-On-String Guitar Tuner from
Planet Waves.

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Posted in: Music Gear