Pal Pal Twistor Review

Device:
Palm V/Vx

The Pal Pal Twistor
case for the Palm V/Vx is the first plastic play through hard case that I’ve
seen for the Palm V. This case is made of a tough Poly Carbonate that can
withstand impacts and twisting. Seven different colors are available: Blue,
Navy, Orange, Green, Yellow, Purple, and Red. Only the bottom half of the case
is actually colored though. The top half is made of a brushed clear plastic with
a totally clear window the size of the display (not including the graffiti
portion).


Since this window is clear, you can easily read the screen when an alarm goes
off without needing to open the case. Although you will still need to open the
case if you want to actually respond to an alarm.

The case is made of two halves. Instead of opening like a
book, the case opens like a note pad or most flip cases. This makes the
case easy to hold and use for both right and left handed people. To
me it feels more comfortable than the metal hard cases like the Rhino Aluminum
case.The Palm attaches to the case via the left stylus silo. A plastic rail
on the bottom half of the case fits easily into the silo and holds the
Palm in place. The top half of the case is hinged to the bottom half and
can open and close freely. There isn’t any type of clasp to hold the case
closed though. I think the case would be safer in terms of protecting the
display if there was a way to keep the cover closed. As it is, dropping
the case would probably result in the cover flying open.

The plastic is quite strong. It is approximately 1/16th of an inch
thick.  I didn’t have any fears of putting the
case in my back jeans pocket and sitting on it.

When the cover is closed, the Palm V is protected all over except for the
sides. The stylus silos are exposed. I think I would like the case better if the
sides were totally enclosed.


Even with the case closed, I didn’t have any problems inserting or extracting
a stylus from the silo. Even the PDA Panache
Palm V stylus works well with this case.

I did find that the contrast button at the top of the Palm V is covered and not accessible while using the Pal-Pal Twistor. Although I personally don’t use the contrast button, I know there are people that use popular hacks that allow this button to launch applications.

One nice thing about this case is that you don’t have to remove the Palm V to
hotsync or charge it. You can just fold the case to the side when you need to
insert it into the cradle. I think that this is a big plus.

All in all, this is a nice case that protects the screen and is strong enough
to allow you to put it in your back pocket (at least in my back pocket…) and
adds very little to the overall size and weight of the Palm V.

Price: $32.00

Pros:
See through window.
Small and light weight.
Able to hotsync in cradle while in the case.

Cons:
Nothing keeps the cover closed.
Sides are exposed.
Contrast button not accessible.

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11 thoughts on “Pal Pal Twistor Review”

  1. Koss makes a great pair of earbuds with nice soft replaceable earpieces to them called ‘The Plug’. They come with a nice coin-purse type pouch and run for about $20 at Target, etc.

    Radio Shack offers a similar product- probably made by Koss, for about the same price but easier to find. Part number #33-167.

    I am using the Shack’s versions and find them very secure and comfortable with my T-665’s MP3 system and other applications. I generally carry them with me in either in my pocket or gear bag- they pack away small and light.

  2. I have been using a pair of Sony headphone for the past couple of years and they are the smallest pair you can find. Plus they fit in your ear like plugs which are wonderful at sealing out a lot of noise. Come with two different sizes depending on your ear size. I have always disliked the kind of earphone that easily falls out of my ear. These don’t.

    http://www.sonystyle.com/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/eCS/Store/en/-/USD/SY_DisplayProductInformation-Start;sid=j9q8DEWL0ma8PHvNAYm2BwqHu61OPB5u2s8=?CatalogCategoryID=lwkKC0%2eNncYAAADzaeZwtDfx&ProductID=v0YKC0%2eN65wAAADz1%2eJwtDf1&Dept=acc

    If you can’t get to the link the model number is MDR-EX70LP.

    Regards,

    Andy Cheng
    Plano, TX

  3. I’ve never been able to wear ear buds for any length of time because my ears are too small, so instead I’ve been wearing the sony MDR-Q33 headphones. They’re regular foarm-covered headphones that sit independently on each ear, no neck or head strap. they’re quite comfortable (the plastic peices that hold them onto your ear are adjustable) and they’re pretty inexpensive (mine were $30 at best buy last june, the price may have changed since then). I really can’t praise them enough.
    In fact, after seeing mine, my sister ditched her iPod headphones (which were painful in her similarly small ears) for a pair of the Sony ones. Here’s the page on sony’s website

    oh, and they feel just fine when wearing glasses.

  4. The Gadgeteers are being attacked by crappy headphones! Run! Run! 😮

    Really, I feel like I’ve been on a crusade lately against people suggesting overpriced under-achieving headphones. Basically, none of the Sonys except for the d66 Eggos (Japan only), V6 (NOT v600), 7506, cd3000 on up are any good. The rest give you bad sound at a high price. I promise you can do better. 😉

    The Koss plugs aren’t very good either, and if you wanted to stick things in your ears, you’d be better off with Etymotic er6’s. However, there are good Koss headphones to be found. The ksc-50, 55 are excellent, as are the portapros.

    It depends on your needs and the source of your audio really. A favorite of mine to pair with pdas is the Sennheiser px200, however none of my many headphones can make the Tungsten sound good. That audio patch was a joke.

    Before you buy some expensive low-quality Sonys, please check out..

    http://www.headphone.com

    Whew – the lone crusader against bad sound.. 😎

  5. The sound quality of the B&O’s are flawless. But they are a bit pricey at $170. I wear glasses too and they fit snugly.

    As for true audiophile quality, nothing beats a pair of Grado’s. Absolutely the best sound quality. But if you’re talking to the average mainstream set, all they know are sennheiser and sony’s. Not even in the same league. Remember, I’m comparing audiophiles who spend about $10k on Mark Levinson amps and not someone who buys their stuff from Circuit City.

    It all comes down to personal preference and whether you’ll be able to tell the difference.

  6. When you say Grado beats all Sony, and all Sennheisers, that’s not exactly the most accurate of statements.

    Firstly, it depends on what model headphone you’re talking about, and the quality of your sources. For example, Senn 600s with an iPod and a rather nice Porta Corda II headphone amp can sound uninspiring. The Senn 600s need far better to really sing. Each model sounds so different that it’s too broad to say one brand beats another.

    The Grados have always been far too bright for my taste. You could call them Grate-ohs. And at 32ohms impedence, they’re still not all that efficient, meaning they _have_to have an amp in order to sound their best. Models I’m referring to here are the sr40s, sr60s, sr80s, sr125s, sr 325s, and rs-2s. No, I haven’t heard the rs-1s. I currently own the sr60 and use them whenever I want an instant headache. They’re just too bright for my tastes although of course everyone has different preferences.

    Most of the Sony headphones do suck…until you get into the realm of the v6 (not v600) or 7506, the D66 EGGO, the cd3000 and the r10. To say those suck means there’s probably something wrong with your other audio gear.

    And lastly, I’d call the B&O a8s the king of the cheap earbuds. They’re reliable, they don’t distort too badly, but otherwise they’re not too accurate, and they lack in mids, lows and highs. But for cheap headphones they’re a bit pricey. If price isn’t an issue, then they’re not bad with pdas in that pdas are horrible audio sources and you’re not missing much sound-quality wise. And yes, I bought a pair in a moment of insanity.

    But to say that _all_ Grados are better than _all_ Sonys and _all_ Sennheisers…and then turn around and say that B&O a8s are good.. well, maybe you should take a trip over to http://www.head-fi.org 😉

    It’s not an audiophile snob thing. You can get awesome sound with modest gear, but you have to audition lots of stuff in order to find what works best with your sources.

    ——-
    Grundig 4100 pcdp, porta corda II amp, Beyerdynamic dt990, etymotic er6s, G4 iMac w/ M-audio Sonica, iPod, Sony d66 Eggos, Sennheiser px200

    Originally posted by contempt
    [B]The sound quality of the B&O’s are flawless. But they are a bit pricey at $170. I wear glasses too and they fit snugly.

    As for true audiophile quality, nothing beats a pair of Grado’s. Absolutely the best sound quality. But if you’re talking to the average mainstream set, all they know are sennheiser and sony’s. Not even in the same league. Remember, I’m comparing audiophiles who spend about $10k on Mark Levinson amps and not someone who buys their stuff from Circuit City.

    It all comes down to personal preference and whether you’ll be able to tell the difference. [/B]

  7. Julie – reading your diary post about Pockettunes, it’s not just you, it definately distorts in a Rice Krispies sort of way. 😮 Aeroplayer also distorted until the latest version, which cleared up the sound a good bit. Could it be that we’re hearing the Palm access the memory card?

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