PlanetBox is the eco-friendly lunchbox for kids or adults

NEWS – Just like with most reusable lunch kits, taking your lunch from home will be more eco-friendly.  You will reduce waste because you won’t need plastic bags, waxed paper, or aluminum foil to package up your lunch.  You don’t have to worry if the PlanetBox lunchbox is food-safe and BPA-free.  PlanetBox says they take “non-toxic, non-leaching, safe from BPA, phthalates, and lead” very seriously.  Their lunch kit isn’t made of plastic – it’s made of high-quality stainless steel that’s warranted for 5 years.

PlanetBox lunchboxes have been thoughtfully designed after years of studying how people use lunchboxes.  They have compartments of various sizes to hold sandwiches or an entree, veggies, chips, fruit, and even some tiny compartments for dressings or even a small dessert.  The size of the compartments can guide you to pack sensible portions.  The lunch kits are dishwasher safe, and unlike plastic containers, the stainless steel doesn’t stain or hold on to odors.

The boxes are available in three sizes, so just like Goldilocks, you’ll be able to find a PlanetBox that’s just right for the way you pack lunch for your kids or yourself.  The Shuttle (small, center) holds 3.5 cups of food and is $39.95; the medium-sized Rover (left) holds 5 cups of food and is $55.95; and the large Launch (right) holds 7 cups of food and is $59.95.  You can purchase magnet kits to personalize the kits with designs from dinosaurs to galaxies, or you can have custom-printed magnets made for a truly unique kit.

PlanetBoxes are available alone or as part of kit with magnets, a carrying bag, and a drink bottle.  Other accessories, like cutlery sets, napkins, and snack containers, are also available.  Shop PlanetBox for your own eco-friendly lunchbox and accessories.  Also check out the meal planning ideas while you’re at the PlanetBox website.

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10 thoughts on “PlanetBox is the eco-friendly lunchbox for kids or adults”

    1. It’s simple ROI. If it keeps you from eating out a few times, it’s paid for itself.

      The manufacturers know this and price accordingly.

      Call it a status symbol or call it something that actually works to keep people from eating a burger every day.

      Either way, it’s hard to find a victim here.

        1. Those are lunchboxes. The planetboxes are lunch trays; I don’t think you’d eat stir-fry straight of of those lunchboxes. The trays are similar to a lunch tray in a cafeteria but with a hinged lid that keeps everything in place.

  1. Fair enough, there are factors other than the financial aspect. Brown paper bags compost/mulch very nicely. Does PlanetBox engage in any environmental causes to help defer the substantial impact of steel production (from their Chinese-based manufacturers)?

    1. I’m not trying to argue here, but brown paper bags work for foods that don’t require refrigeration. When my daughter was in school, I needed an insulated bag to keep her lunch edible and safe. I didn’t have a reusable container for inside the bag, so I used a lot of plastic bags, aluminum foil, and those little plastic cups they sell yogurts and fruit cups in. (My daughter tended to lose a lot of Tupperware lids and/or containers). If I had a container like this, I could have cut down on a lot of waste. It wouldn’t have been so easy for her to lose parts of a big, single container.

      That said, it doesn’t sound like PlanetBox has programs to address the impact of the steel production. In their FAQs, they say: “Stainless steel is 100% recyclable, meaning less waste in our landfills. Most stainless steel is also made of approximately 60% recycled content. Your PlanetBox lunchbox is made to last a very long time, so we don’t anticipate that you would need to recycle it any time soon.”

      They also tout how easy it is to do small repairs to the lunchbox yourself. It sounds as if they are counting on longevity of the product and replacing disposible packaging as the only aspects of their eco-friendly claims.

      It seems if you bought it for your kindergartener and used it all the way through high school, you might be to the eco good side. I’m not so sure how “friendly” it would be for an adult. However, some people may like it for their health (because it guides you to limit quantities in a way a collection of reusable plastic containers wouldn’t) and find it worth it.

    2. Are you arguing against a reusable container that will last longer than a human lifetime — in favour of disposable — for sustainability reasons?

      1. Didn’t take long for someone to trot out a Sock Pocket to throw down some classic fallacies…

        “Why u h8 sustainability?”
        “Think of the children!”

        Things get fierce when some types of “principles” are on the line, don’t they… “The Gadgeteer may receive a commission on purchases made from affiliate links on our posts.”

        Don’t worry, I won’t both to visit or comment on the eco-bling echo chamber.

  2. Interesting. When I saw the picture, it immediately reminded me of the tiffin boxes used in Asia for lunches.
    I was also wondering on how to handle food that needs heating, but I saw on the website that they sell glass containers that fit in the compartments.

    Thank you Janet.

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