Maestri House Milk Frother review – consistently great foam for your coffee

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REVIEW – I’ve dabbled with several espresso/coffee machines and a couple of options for milk frothing, including steam wants on some of our machines or standalone devices. We’ve most recently been using an aging milk frother/heater in our house the last few years, but it often burns the milk a bit and has been inconsistent at times in terms of temperature and frothiness. Maestri offered to send over their Maestri House Milk Frother to review so I’ll see if it’s an improvement over our mediocre current appliance. I’m hopeful that a higher quality milk frother will make the morning pick-me-up that much better.

What is it?

The Maestri House Milk Frother is a milk frother. To be more specific for anyone unfamiliar with fancy coffee drinks, many of them include heated and aerated milk (ie. frothy). This, combined with various types of coffee make the dizzying variety of options to drink at your local coffee house. The Maestri House Milk Frother is capable of several heat and froth levels, as well as being able to do cold froth as well. Everything but the base unit is dishwasher safe, and made out of stainless steel, so it should last.

What’s in the box?

  • Maestri House Milk Frother
  • User Pamphlet
  • Sponge Brush
  • Frothing Whisk

Hardware specs

  • Temperature settings: cold/120°F/140°F/160°F
  • Froth settings: Low/Medium/High
  • Dishwasher safe (top rack)
  • Build materials: 304 Stainless Steel and plastic
  • Max liquid volume (with low foam setting): 600 ml / 21 oz. (equivalent to foam for 6 lattes)
  • Min liquid volume: 150 ml / 3.5 oz
  • Power: 550 Watts

Design and features

The base of the Maestri House Milk Frother is clean and simple with a single LCD screen to show info and 3 buttons. From left to right, there’s a temperature button to adjust heating settings, the power/start/off button, and the froth level button. Temperature and froth settings are indicated on the screen, and audible beeps indicate the beginning and end of heating cycles.

In the photo above, you can see the interior of the stainless steel milk jug, with the lid being lifted off. There are three marked lines, the lowest being the minimum liquid line, then a maximum high-froth line, then a maximum low-froth line.  Below is a shot of the jug with the lid affixed but out of the base:

The whisk unit also seems to be all stainless steel. 3 parts easily detach from each other (shown below) for cleaning, and simply rest on the bottom of the jug (guided and spun by magnets during use).

The photo above shows inside the base of the Maestri House Milk Frother. The milk jug rests securely in this base, which heats through a direct-contact heating surface and spins the whisk with magnets.

Setup and use

Setting up the Maestri House Milk Frother is quite simple: you just need to clean off the milk jug, whisk, and lid, and plug it in! The video below shows the full cycle (combined with a Nespresso double-shot):

Setting the temperature, cup size, and operating the Maestri House Milk Frother is as easy as any other appliance I own. It consistently makes perfectly even foamy milk every morning (I’ve tested it for nearly a month with almost daily use). As with most milk frothers, time is of the essence: if you let the frothed milk sit after the cycle finishes, it will separate fairly quickly from all-foam to two layers of hot milk and foam. Depending on your preferences this could be good or bad, so it’s just up to you on when to pour (I usually work fast and pour while it’s still mostly foam). It definitely seems capable of doing “latte art” – the fancy designs you see on the top of coffee from skilled baristas. This is something I am definitely not capable of doing, but the consistency of the resulting foam looks perfect for artistic designs.

Maestri has instructions for different types of milk (like nut and oat milks), though I didn’t test with those. The cycle I used most (140 degrees and medium-foam) takes about 2 minutes, though this can vary depending on the amount of liquid you input.

My testing with old-fashioned cow’s milk was consistent and positive. We never needed much more than the minimum amount of liquid for one or two people, but I like that if we’re ever entertaining and want to serve hot (or cold) chocolates or coffees to a group, we can do up to 6 latte-sized servings in a batch.

What I like

  • Easy to use
  • Easy to clean
  • Large liquid capacity

What I’d change

  • Nothing!

Final thoughts

This was one of those rare reviews where I thought long and hard about the “What I’d change” section, and really came up with nothing. The Maestri House Milk Frother does exactly what it’s designed to do, in a user-friendly way, and is easy to clean up after. I didn’t have any burnt milk or strange batches, consistency was solid. This essential appliance takes its spot on our counter as our new daily driver!

Price: $89.99
Where to buy: Maestri House and Amazon
Source: The sample of this product was provided by Maestri House

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