Warm (but not fuzzy) ValueRays Mouse Review

warm_mouse_pkg_1They stole my idea.  But since I’m pretty pathetic with mechanics and electronics not to mention legal situations at least now I can buy one of these.  The ValueRays Warm Mouse III ($29.95) and its companions the Warm Mouse Pad, Warm Mouse Blanket and Warm Keyboard Pad can provide some well needed infrared heat now that winter is coming.  And I know no one believes me, but when it is cold outside your hands become colder at the keyboard.  The mouse hand especially begins to feel like a partially frozen fish flopping back and forth between the keyboard and mouse.

First, note that I am the president of the  Chili-Willi Foundation and for some reason winter always comes early for me.  I’m also the president of the Grouchy Consumer Club and I am skeptical about products that seem too good to be true.  But I really wanted something for my cold dead-fish hand and stumbled upon the Warm Mouse, Mouse Hand Warmer and Warm Keyboard Pad.  I tried this trio out for a test drive.  All of these devices rely on USB interfaces for their energy.

Warm Mouse III

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This is an ergonomic type of optical mouse, slightly angled.  Has the normal PC mouse buttons and scroller, as well as a velocity button and on/off switch for the heat.  No software was needed for the install.   I just plugged it in and was doubly surprised:  First, it warmed up in about 30 seconds, and secondly, it became pleasantly warm.  I was expecting it to be a wimpy lukewarm since that is how most “heated” gadgets (like the indoor inflatable spa, ahem) are manufactured these days — not enough heat.  But the mouse lived up to its hype.  Check one off for a product that works the way that it is supposed to.

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The Warm Mouse III is a little bigger than I’d prefer, but ValueRays also carries the Warm Mouse I, which is a more traditional shape.  I might buy Mouse I next, but in the meantime I got used to the Mouse III and found that it moves fine, scrolls fine, and warms up especially fine.  I even turned it’s heat off one day.

Mouse Hand Warmer

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While I am now seriously addicted to the heat that the mouse provides, the upper part of my hand still becomes chilled (though it no longer turns purple).  I kind of knew that would happen so I was really hoping the Mouse Hand Warmer ($19.95) would finish thawing out my scales.  The Hand Warmer is like a fleece sleeping bag for your mouse, mouse pad, and hand.  It has a non-slick bottom (so it won’t slide around on your desk) and it too is a plug-n-play USB device.  (The photo shows the warmer without its removable USB cord.)  It warms up, though not as much as the mouse.

See also:  Kanex MultiSync Premium Slim Bluetooth Keyboard review

The main issue I had with the Hand Warmer is that it lies flat.  I tend to bounce back and forth between the keyboard and mouse – sometimes in a frenetic (ok, neurotic) manner.  It’s too awkward for me to go from typing on the keyboard and then switching to the mouse for another task and having to dive into the Hand Warmer.  But I wanted this thing to work.  So I rigged a frame out of a coat hanger to hold it open, somewhat resembling a pup tent and that seems to work.

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Rube Goldberg frame to hold the hand warmer open

But the hanger sometimes gets in the way and it is klunky to set it up.  If I were selling the Hand Warmer, I’d think seriously about providing some type of bendable, internal frame that allows the user to either keep the warmer flat or open.  One other warning about the Warmer: ValueRays sell a non-USB version of the warmer and it is easy when shopping for the device to choose the wrong one; so be careful if you want to order the heated version.

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Warm Mouse in the Hand Warmer

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Mr. Fuzzy likes it too

Warm Keyboard Pad

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The Warm Keyboard Pad ($19.95) works too and its purpose is to provide some heat to the non-mouse hand.  It’s a standard keyboard pad but with a removable (via zipper) jacket and non-skid bottom.  Removing the jacket reveals the infrared heat pad.

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I don’t usually use a keyboard pad so I couldn’t really get used to it, but if I were a keyboard pad user I think I’d quickly become addicted to this heated version.  I wish I were a keyboard pad user now that I think of it.

Instead, though, I scavenged the heating element from the keyboard pad, split open the back of the Hand Warmer and shoved the heating pad into the Hand Warmer.  As I said, I want this to work.  And I get very cold.

All in all, the Warm Mouse and friends are keepers.   The outer part of the mouse hand can still be cold so the Hand Warmer is a nice complement.  It is even nicer with a frame to keep it open and a second heater element.  The keyboard pad heater is also a great sidekick for those who use keyboard pads.

See also:  Autonomous SmartDesk 2 standing desk review

Final note:  While afflicted with low cold tolerance, I do not have arthritis in my hand or wrist, nor car-pool tunnel syndrome, but I did discuss these products with an office mate who does.  He has an ergonomic mouse similar to the Warm Mouse III and he said it (the angled-type of mouse) is much more comfortable than the traditional flat mouse.  So if you do have these maladies, this mouse may offer some help for you in that respect.  He didn’t seem particularly excited about the idea of the Warm Mouse or Hand Warmer (he uses a tiny sliding mouse tray that the warmer would not fit on), but he says his hand gets stiff and cold and was interested in the Warm Mouse Pad.  I think that will be my next purchase too.  Something new to report at the next Chili Willi meeting.

This works too and its purpose is to provide some heat to the non-mouse hand.  It is well made, with a removable jacket and non-skid bottom.  Removing the jacket reveals the infrared heat pad.

I don’t usually use a keyboard pad so I couldn’t really get used to it, but if I were a keyboard pad user I think I’d quickly become addicted to this heated version.  I wish I were a keyboard pad user just for the benefit of the heat.

Instead, though, I scavenged the heating pad, split open the back of the Hand Warmer and shoved the heating pad into the Hand Warmer.  As I said, I want this to work.  And I get very cold.

While afflicted with low cold tolerance, I do not have arthritis in my hand or wrist, nor car-pool tunnel syndrome, but I did discuss these products with an office mate who does.  He has an ergonomic mouse similar to the Warm Mouse III and he said it (the angled-type of mouse) is much more comfortable than the traditional flat mouse.  So if you do have these maladies, this mouse may offer some help for you in that respect.  He didn’t seem particularly excited about the idea of the Warm Mouse or Hand Warmer (he uses a tiny sliding mouse tray that the warmer would not fit on), but was kind of interested in the Warm Mouse Pad.  I think that will be my next purchase too.

 

Product Information

Price:Mouse III -$29.95 Mouse Hand Warmer - $19.95 (hanger not included) Warm Keyboard Pad - $19.95
Manufacturer:ValueRays
Pros:
  • Works
Cons:
  • Mouse Hand Warmer does not come with a frame
7 comments… add one
  • ValueRays® October 28, 2009, 1:04 pm

    Thanks so very much for the wonderful article and review. It will be posted on our Warm Reviews Page with a link back to this article. Much appreciated!

    http://www.ValueRays.com

  • Amy Silverston February 7, 2012, 11:59 am

    Before going ahead, see reviews of the warm mouse on Amazon. We bought one, it didn’t work and the one-woman company, refused absolutely to replace it – unless I paid more in shipping and spurious additional purchased guarantee certificates than the original purchase price in order to get a ‘free’ replacement.

    Someone else has bought something from this product range that also doesn’t work.

  • BK May 30, 2013, 12:42 pm

    I’ve been using the Valuerays heated mouse for a few years now and love it. I also have their heated mouse pad. Both work as described. I wouldn’t put much value in the Silverstein comment. I’d definitely recommend and shop with the Valuerays company again. Their products are wonderful!

  • Amy Silverston May 30, 2013, 4:36 pm

    I set more store in people who can read a word and then copy it correctly – but then, we English can be prickly like that and I get irritated when people scramble my name.

    To address your unfounded claims:

    Yes, I am a freelance hired hand, but not doing what you suggest – besides, I would be too expensive! Rather, it is because I have three young children and my former job as new business manager for an advertising agency doesn’t come in part time versions. I do desk research for ad agencies, the reading-around into the markets of potential clients that has to be done when preparing to pitch for their advertising account. You evidently read my LinkedIn profile which explains this and gives links to examples of my consultancy work; how you managed to jump to the conclusion that I am paid to run smear campaigns is incomprehensible.

    I work at home, in a Victorian house in North London that gets cold in winter, not in a modern super-heated office, and I spend a lot of time sitting at the computer in a north-facing room (put postcode NW5 1SH into Google Maps to see what I mean). I have Reynauds Syndrome, which means that my feet and hands get extremely cold, plus multiple sclerosis, which means I move rather slowly and cannot warm myself up via activity like running up the stairs.

    Hence my getting the heated mouse, astonishment at the overseas shipping charge, my huge disappointment when it didn’t work and fury when the lady selling them refused to abide by what I now understand is US consumer law and replace it.

    However, my professional background means I understand the potency of recommendations and the importance of their opposite when a consumer receives shoddy goods and experiences poor service. Various online sales sites are littered with comments and experiences with these Valuerays products that are analogous to mine – their tatty build quality, propensity to break shortly after purchase if they work at all, and ValueRay’s refusal to do anything about it.

    BK, you are very lucky that yours work. I would have been similarly delighted if mine had too. An awful lot of people have not enjoyed the same and have been left feeling ripped off and utterly exasperated by their dealings with the ValueRays company.

    BK, I think I deserve an apology.

  • eliza September 26, 2013, 11:33 am

    love the hand warmer, I’m bringinb a hanger to work tomorrow thanks for the tip…will order the warm mouse next payday, I currently wear a glove w/out fingers, but it is a pain moving from mouse to keyboard, I’d like to find a smaller keyboard that I can work with just my left hand and keep my right hand inside the warmer always

  • Marj March 12, 2014, 2:12 pm

    I ordered several heated mouses for people at work. It was a great idea :S

    Don’t order the blue mouse. It is tiny, the cord is short and it looks extremely cheap.

    The CEO looks like a better size, the pink one is very large.

    The two blue mouses (mice?) heat up and operation seems to be adequate. It heats what would be your palm if you are 8 years old. No heat for the fingers.

    Because it is so small, my wrist has to rest on my desk.

    Not terribly happy.

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