Wicked Lasers FlashTorch Mini flashlight review

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Back in 2012 I reviewed Wicked Lasers’ first generation Torch and in 2014 their second generation more polished FlashTorch. Both touted at the time as “the most powerful handheld flashlight in the World” and at a whopping 4100 lumens, they were wickedly bright, extremely hot, but rather large.  The designers at Wicked Lasers have recently introduced a smaller, lighter member of the Torch family called the FlashTorch Mini that packs a respectable 2300 lumens of bright, hot light into a sleeker, slimmer form factor.

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As its name implies, the Mini is smaller and lighter than its older siblings, measuring in at just under a foot long and weighing 1.2 lbs. The FlashTorch Mini has a good weight, balance, and one-handed grip to it. Like the Torch and FlashTorch, the FlashTorch Mini’s black housing is constructed of a powder-coated, aircraft grade aluminum (and is shaped very much like a lightsaber hilt). The front lens is made of a specialized heat-resistant glass, so it will not crack or shatter due to the decent amount of heat the FlashTorch Mini generates.

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In the box:

  • FlashTorch Mini
  • Battery (preinstalled)
  • Power brick and cable
  • Nylon belt pouch
  • Instruction manual

Specifications:

Lamp Output: 2300 Lumens with a High-Efficiency Reflector
Dimensions: 57mm x 47mm x 219mm
Weight: 387g
Power Supply: 3 x 18650 Lithium-Ion Battery Pack
Power Consumption: 11.4V@5.5A
Battery Lifetime: 30 – 100 Minutes
Bulb Type: Carley Lamps CL-1909 65W
Expected Bulb Life: 60 – 1000 Hours
Color Temperature: ~3400°K
Body:  6061-T6 Aircraft-Grade Aluminum
Finish: Mil-Spec Type III hard anodized in black
LED switch: Low, Medium & High Power modes
Tail switch: On/Off Button
Warranty: One Year


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The FlashTorch Mini is approximately two-thirds the size, weight, and brightness of the full sized FlashTorch.

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The FlashTorch’s light source is not a LED like a majority of today’s higher end flashlights, but a filament-based 65W halogen bulb, estimated to last up to 1000 hours of use.  It is truly impressive how much heat and light the little bulb can produce.

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As mentioned above, the front heat-resistant glass lens is engineered to not break due to the heat the FlashTorch Mini generates. Being “just” 2300 lumens, the Mini does not get as crazy hot as the Torch or FlashTorch but does create a good amount of heat (see video below). Surrounding the halogen bulb is a high efficiency reflector that funnels the light into a more directed and concentrated beam. The heat-resistant lens and reflector projects the Mini’s light into a semi-wide floodlight or searchlight kind/type of beam.

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The base of the flashlight has an on/off switch to help ensure that it is not inadvertently switched on. There are also three hard points at the far end for attaching a lanyard or strap to the hilt.

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The flashlight has a LED illuminated power switch just below the head of the flashlight that glows green when on. The FlashTorch Mini has three power settings: high / medium / low that cycle thru via the thumb switch. On a fully charged battery, the Mini can operate between 30 – 100 minutes depending on brightness level. The aluminum body of the FlashTorch Mini is engineered to dissipate the heat generated by the halogen bulb making for a decent enough hand warmer on a cold night.

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On the opposite side from the power switch, the Mini’s handle has a built-in power port for charging. The power port has a rubber cover to protect it from gunk, damage, and moisture.

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Also like the original FlashTorch, the Mini’s power cable and brick are large, as big as one you would use on a large laptop. This charging system is bulky and not very transportable to say the least. The battery plug port has LED indicator lights on either side that glow red while charging and green when fully charged. It does take a fair amount of time to recharge the Mini’s battery after being completely depleted.

wickedlasers_minitorch-outside

The picture above does a good job of illustrating the Mini’s three brightness levels. As you can see, even at its lowest brightness setting the smaller FlashTorch is more than capable of lighting your way. The high setting definitely lights up our very dark and gloomy ravine without any problems. Being halogen based, the light the FlashTorch Mini produces is more yellow and warm than the white light of a typical LED flashlight.

The nylon belt pouch is well made and fitted for the FlashTorch Mini making for an easy and convenient way to carry the flashlight.

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According to Wicked Lasers, the FlashTorch Mini is the smallest burning/fire starting flashlight in the world…see video above 😉 .

wickedlasers_minitorch-inhand

Wicked Lasers has done a good job creating a more compact version of the FlashTorch. Considering the Mini’s smaller size, it produces a very bright beam to illuminate your way. In my original reviews, I classified both of its siblings as “handheld spotlights”, and even at 2300 lumens their new flashlight still lives up to its heritage.

Source: The sample for this review was provided by Wicked Lasers. Please visit their site for more info and to order.

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Product Information

Price:$199
Manufacturer:Wicked Lasers
Pros:
  • Very bright (2300 lumens)
  • Well made/constructed from aircraft grade aluminum
  • Lightsaber hilt look/design
  • Can light things on fire
  • Convienent battery charging port
  • Rechargeable batteries that do not need to be removed
  • Easy to use
  • One year warranty
Cons:
  • Just OK battery life
  • Large power brick
7 comments… add one
  • Gadgio December 13, 2016, 11:49 am

    Nice stuff! I’m a fan of the WickedLasers brand. Do you feel you get sufficiently more for your money than you’d get from one of the far cheaper Chinese unbrands?

  • Marko Koskenoja December 14, 2016, 5:04 pm

    “It is truly impressive how much heat and light the little bulb can produce” – why would anyone want their flashlight to create heat? As someone who uses 18650- Cree based flash lights and head lamps every night taking my old dogs out for walks and now plowing snow in my tractor I can’t understand why anyone would pay so much for a flash light when you can buy very well made ones in eBay for less than $15.

    • Dave Rees December 14, 2016, 5:15 pm

      Hi Marko,

      The comment was more of a science geek one than anything. I can’t argue that there are many LED based lights that are less expensive and last much longer on a charge.

  • Marko Koskenoja December 14, 2016, 5:12 pm

    Why halogen? I replaced all my inefficient halogen inside light fixtures as well as my inefficient motion detection halogen outdoor lights and halogen work lamp with the much more efficient new LED models.

    • Alan Claver December 14, 2016, 5:25 pm

      I’m guessing because you can’t drive LEDs at that output for any length of time. There are portable LED lights that have 1000 and 2000 lumen modes but they throttle back automatically after a short time.

      • Marko Koskenoja December 15, 2016, 6:24 am

        I have bought and used at least 20 LED CREE flashlights and headlamps and have never experienced any dimming until the 18650 battery runs low.

        I even replaced the halogen headlight bulbs on my Kubota B7800 tractor with LED headlight bulbs. That and the tractor halogen work light with a LED light bar.

        Really, CREE LED’s are much brighter and more efficient that halogen bulbs.

  • James Maple December 23, 2016, 2:52 am

    The flashlight is brilliant except the it does not have the LED which is known to save power.
    Probably why it can only last for 1000 hours, with slight change in the light it can go to 100,000 hours

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