Makey Makey Go makes your spacebar edible

{ 3 comments }

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Have you ever wanted to use a doughnut as your spacebar? Have you been hankering to use jello as a game controller? Yeah me neither, but now you can thanks to the most unusual Kickstarter project ever, Makey Makey Go.

Makey Makey Go is a device composed of a USB dongle and a wire with two alligator clips. You attach one alligator clip to any electrically conductive object and the other to the USB dongle. You then insert the dongle into your computer. The object attached to the alligator clip then functions as the keyboard or mouse button of your choice.

I’m not entirely certain there are practical uses for this, but I am definitely intrigued. I’m hoping someone will use several of these to make the most delicious Rube Goldberg machine ever.

If you’ve always dreamed of having a pastry based keyboard check out their Kickstarter project site. You can purchase a Makey Makey Go for $19. The projected delivery date is November 2015. If nothing else, the project’s video is worth checking out.

Posted in: Do-It-Yourself, How-To, News
{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Russell May 16, 2015, 3:06 pm

    I can see a great demand for this in the game modding community, especially for something like the Artemis Spaceship Bridge Simulator (artemis.eochu.com and http://artemis.forumchitchat.com/?forum=309503). There are large portions of the Artemis community building their own custom bridges and having the ability to create a touch sensitive custom panel on the cheap to give a real sci-fi feel to the game would have a huge draw. This would also remove a lot of the need for soldering and wiring, a major time saver, but the original MaKey MaKey would probably better suited for them as quite a few keys are generally needed rather than just a single one as this device is intended for.

    • Andrew Baker May 17, 2015, 5:06 pm

      I would tend to think that those types of people (ME) wouldn’t mind the soldering part. 🙂

  • DStaal May 16, 2015, 4:53 pm

    I can see this being useful for a variety of small-scale science experiments. It’s a quick and easy sensor you can attach to lots of different things.

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