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Is Tic the future of button fasteners?

on July 11, 2014 10:00 am

tic-fastener

A couple of days ago I took us on a trip down gadget memory lane when I remembered the Ronco Buttoneer button fastener from the 1970’s. Today Luis Reyes left a comment that there’s a new button fastener in town and it’s called Tic. Designed in Sweden, Tic lets you permanently fasten shirt buttons without using needle and thread. How does it work?

tic-fastener2

Tic is a folding plastic clip that has a tiny two pronged plastic spike that goes through the garment material and the button holes. The clip is pinched together and then wiggled back and forth to break the spike from the clip. What you’re left with is a button attached permanently to the material. Tics are available in black and white and come in packs of 4 for a price of 5.50 EUR ($7.48 US). For that price you’re obviously not going to use them for every clothes item in your closet with a missing button, but it might be worth having a pack in your gear bag for those emergency situations when you don’t have time to sew a button back on with needle and thread. For more info visit Tic.

To better understand how it works, see the demonstration video below.

Comments

  1. 1
    Sandee Cohen says:

    Found the “original” Buttoneer on Amazon as “The Avery Dennison Original Buttoneer.”

  2. 2

    @Sandee I saw that too but am confused when they call it the original with it obviously is not…

  3. 3
    Sandee Cohen says:

    @Julie,

    I have a feeling that Avery Dennison (which has been around for a billion years) was the company that first created the Buttoneer and then Ronco bought it from them.

    Or Avery bought it from Ronco with the stipulation that they could call it “The Original.”

  4. 4

    Yes, you’re right, Dennison does have their name on what I consider the original Buttoneer box.

  5. 5

    That Tic is really expensive if as in the video you have a button with 2 sets of holes, as you would need two of the four clips for one button!

  6. 6
  7. 7
    Sandee Cohen says:

    @Betty,

    Old trick if you have a button with four holes:

    Do only two diagonally.

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